Tag Archives: George Lynch

Review: Lynch Mob’s The Brotherhood

By Andrew Catania

When I interviewed George Lynch last month, I told him The Brotherhood was my second favorite Lynch Mob album to their debut record.  Not discounting the other great records in Lynch Mob’s catalog.

The Brotherhood,  Produced by Chris “The Wizard” Collier (Lynch Mob; Flotsam And Jetsam; Prong; KXM), The Brotherhood features 11 brand new hard rock tracks from Lynch Mob. This album will surely resonate with long time fans of the band, as well as those longing for that good ol’ hard rock sound and feel. The Brotherhood highlights the unique pairing of Oni Logan and George Lynch, and along with Sean McNabb (bass) and Jimmy D’Anda (drums), the band has created a solid offering from start to finish. From the riffs of “Main Offender” to the finale “Miles Away,”

The Brotherhood sounds great. It’s an album that’s full and rich without feeling overworked, and the band sounds fluid yet tight. As far as songs go the goods are well and truly delivered on an album that could well equal their best.  9/10 Stars

George Lynch Discusses Lynch Mob’s New Album, Offers Career Advice To Zakk Wylde, And The Latest On Another Dokken Reunion

By Andrew Catania

I caught up with George Lynch to discuss the new Lynch Mob album, any potential Dokken reunion, and his future 2018 plans.

Congratulations on the new Lynch Mob Album The Brotherhood.  Personally, this is my second favorite Lynch Mob album as the first Lynch Mob is my favorite.  A classic!

GL:  Well thank you.  That’s saying something.

Photo by Renee Jahnke

What is your favorite song on the new record?

GL:  Miles Away is a beautiful song it’s Pink Floyd’ish.  It’s intense, and that came out of soundcheck rehearsals when we’re on tour, and there was this typical thing you kept quiet, and we got to the point where we were playing it as sort of an interlude piece in between other songs. We did it quite a few times probably a dozen times, or more words become a song, and we developed this song by jamming it live in front of audiences which is interesting so yes, but it’s just I did that stand out.

One of the standout tracks is Main Offender which was the first single primarily written by the drummer Jimmy D’Anda.  And although we all handed him some parts and things like that; we got good things from Jimmy in the end. So it was some fresh blood, and then I say Dr. Jekyll Mr. Hyde which is another song interestingly which was created while we were on the road just jamming at sound check. We never jam the song live in front of the audience. The bones of it were built on the road, and then we brought in the studio and developed it from there. And that’s the second video that’s coming out.  It’s a trippy video.

The main feature of the song that I love is just that trance like hypnotic groove at the end that just goes and goes up.

Chris Collier produced The Brotherhood.  He also did the KXM albums?

GL:  Yeah I mean the band produced. The producer is a tricky word I get you know when I was in bigger bands in the 80s we’d have producers who did a lot less than Chris Collier did. Who could maybe be listed as an engineer, so it’s tricky.  I would say to be fair that any record that Chris has been involved in with me whether it’s KXM or Lynch Mob or others. It’s pretty fair to say he’s a co producer because we use him as a sounding board for ideas and a multi-instrumentalist. He does it all like Jeff Pilson in that respect.  Chris is kind of a utility guy I’m excellent at a lot of things, but Chris is very knowledgeable, with music theory and music history from engineered to mixing mastering.  Chris could get up there and help with background vocals or help Oni flesh out the vocal melody with words. He gets his hands involved in all areas of the music that we’re creating.

Have you thought about producing Lynch Mob Records yourself? 

GL:  I’m not much of a producer.  I used to produce stuff years ago.  Zakk Wylde doesn’t live far for me he lives up the street. We were talking at one point a few years ago, and I tried to be really honest with him, and it was a bit different to be objective I said without hurting feelings or anything, and I mean Zakk’s in a way better place than I am in the marketplace and so it’s a very widely recognized and a fantastic musician.

What I thought was his records don’t do him justice you know. I mean I feel that he could present himself in a lot better way with the right team or producer or writers. But you know what I’m just expressing my opinion, I suggested to him why don’t we get together, and you don’t even have to put my name on it. You don’t even have to pay me. But we live right down the street from each other, and maybe we’ll work on songs together in crafting some songs that are a little more memorable, with bigger hooks sonically a little bit more sophisticated.  He’s such an amazing musician because of so many different things I j know how well directed it is. And that’s just my humble opinion.

Of course, that never happened. So my point is I’d say to your question of whether I would ever consider producing it could be possible in a particular situation that was tailor made to what I can do.

Lynch mob the brotherhood page header

Are you considering doing a solo album? 

GL: I’m considering doing an instrumental solo album next year, but I have many projects going on.  I’ve Never done one. I thought if I do it I figured I need to bring in somebody complete an objective outside influence that takes control. And so you know I’ve done records on my own now for the past 40 years. So maybe I need some fresh ears and eyeballs and new thinking. You know somebody they’ll take me in a whole different direction I’ve never thought of it.  I’d love to have Daniel Lanois produce it.

You’re considered one of the top shredders of all time.  

GL:  I wouldn’t consider myself a shredder by any means. I was practicing last night. I read somewhere somebody said gee I think that I don’t know what they’re referring to but they said something about me and I don’t think I ever heard was the first time I ever heard George attempt it’s like sweeping.  I don’t sweep. Any time I sweep is when my wife asks me to grab a broom and clean up. That’s as close I get to sweeping. I’m not that guy. I have no interest in it. I think at one point it starts looking silly.

I always try to elevate my abilities to a certain point. I’m not a woodshed guy that sits there and practices you know 10 hours a day or anything like that.

I don’t think I want to get complacent in my in my place and my style. I like to push myself.  You know I’m not going to transform myself. It’s not super secret or anything, so shredder is not a term that applies to me.

Photo by Renee Jahnke

Which guitars of yours did you use in The Brotherhood?

GL:  The rhythms were one of my ESP’s I can’t remember which one like the Tiger or the Kamakazi.

George Lynch Les Paul I’ve built it the specs of the 59 or 58 standard, and then I’ve got a beautiful couple of Teles a couple ESP Tele’s, and I’ve got a Linhof tele, and sometimes I’ll throw those on the second track when I want something with more spunk. For solos,  I guess I mix it up I’ve got to get a kamikaze with great sustain.  On some of the tracks where I want that infinite like Steve Vai sustaining kind of the thing. My Kamikaze is probably the bulk of the soloing and when I do ear candy for atmospheric stuff at the very end of the recording process who knows what I’ll bring.

What’s your guitar neck sizes and ratios? 

GL: I have necks that can go from seven and a half radius to no radius. My necks are a 16-inch radius.

What does the rest of 2017 and the beginning of 2018 have in store for you? 

GL: I’ve recorded seven albums in the last two years. So I’ve got to Lynch Mob Brotherhood coming out on September 8th. Next step is we have Sweet and Lynch’s second album coming out in November of this year. Then we have the Ultrasonics record which is finished, and that is coming out January 2018. A team with Corey Glover and guys from War and Tower of Power. That’s our second record. Then we’ve got a Dokken Live DVD and album with new studio tracks coming out sometime early next year as well as a Lynch Mob Live DVD/CD next year. Then I have a project called The Banishment. Tommy Victor from Prong that I’ve been working on for about five years, and we’re hoping to get that out later, the music’s all been made it’s just a slow process getting the vocals finished, and that will come out at some point, and I might even be missing a project here.

Are you going to rejoin Dokken for another reunion?

GL: No there’s nothing. I’m pushing for it. But you know unless all parties are or wanted to happen it’s not going to happen. For various political and economic reasons, there’s there are reasons why it won’t happen. I think those are pretty strong arguments that it won’t. But you know what. Having said that I think there might be a couple of one offs here and there but I’m not sure I’m interested in doing that.

Jon Levin’s Still Rokken With Dokken

By Andrew Catania

Jon Levin is the current guitarist for Dokken.  He was involved with music very early on in life.  He began playing piano at age 4, trumpet by age 7, and guitar at age 9.  Instead of having formal lessons, Levin played along with his favorite musicians including Randy Rhoads, Eric Clapton, and George Lynch.  He played in a club band called Devias at age 19 in the Long Island, New York area and then auditioned for and joined the German Band Warlock at age 22.  When the grunge scene took over in the early 1990s, Levin took a break from being a musician because he wasn’t interested in that type of music.  Levin went to Law School and moved to the West Coast to become an entertainment lawyer.  In his capacity as an entertainment lawyer, Levin has served as legal counsel, working with Jim Paidas of Paidas Management, on a myriad of licensing programs; some of which include Orange County Choppers, Dog the Bounty Hunter, American Hot Rod and Rockstalgia

In 1998, Levin got a call from Jeff Pilson, Dokken’s bassist, who asked him to play some solos on a demo.  He anticipated playing on a solo album for Pilson, but when he eventually arrived at the studio, Dokken in its entirety was there.  Levin played on a Dokken track called ‘Dancin’ known as ‘The Irish Song,’ which originally was supposed to be included on the Erase the Slate album but was later included on the Long Way Home import instead.  However, Levin didn’t join the group full-time until late 2003.  He’s praised by many hardcore Dokken fans for his George Lynch-influenced style of playing.

Throughout the late 80’s, Levin had built himself a solid career as a heavy metal guitarist, most notably with the German Band Warlock.  When Nirvana hit, he saw the writing on the wall.  Levin graduated in 1996 and by 1997 had his practice in Century City.  He used his old music contacts to build his client list, specializing in entertainment contract law, as well as the occasional divorce case because, well, rock stars get divorced a lot.

He still plays guitar in his spare time, but his old music career was the furthest thing from his mind.  So far, in fact, that when one of his clients, a member of Dokken, invited him down to the studio to “play a few solos,” he showed up in a suit and tie. “I’d been in court that day, I think.”  Levin had assumed that he would be helping out his friend and clients solo project.  Instead, he was greeted at the studio door by one of his childhood idols, Don Dokken himself.

Growing up playing in bar bands on Long Island, Levin had studied the solos of Dokken’s original guitarist, George Lynch.  So despite his nerves and Dokken’s deliberately vague directions, he nailed the audition and was invited to perform with the band at a Fourth of July concert in Dallas just a few weeks later, and it was a sold-out show.   There were 20,000 people in attendance.  Despite the success of that gig, Levin opted to go back to his law practice.  “I was getting my business going, and I didn’t want to let that go,” he explains.

He’s been with the band ever since, enjoying the career resurgence they’ve had since their 2003 album, ‘Hell to Pay.’  Levin himself, who now co-writes most of the bands material, had a strong hand in shaping the record.  “I wanted us to do a Dokken-sounding record,” he explains; a concept Don Dokken was slow to commit to, but has since fully embraced.

Jon Levin playing guitar with Dokken

Also, Jon Levin and Lynch Mob shared some moments together.  Lynch Mob released several albums, but the most popular will always be Wicked Sensation in 1990.  Dokken, on the other hand, had more releases and live albums, but neither was able to reach the popularity they had when they were together.  With that being said, in 1993, they gave it another try.  It was a disaster.  They also put out an album that Don claimed was completely controlled by Lynch and was an act to ruin the Dokken name.  Lynch argued that Don refused to modernize his music this was an attempt to put the Dokken name to rest because the album ‘Shadow Life’ was terrible and poorly received.  In 1997, they broke up again when George walked out on a European Tour.

Both went their separate ways again and recorded materials that have done very little to the Heavy Metal landscape, but their names come up in a big way a couple of years ago when they decide to do a song together at Rocklahoma.  It went well. However, one song doesn’t make a band.  Jon Levin is a man wearing two caps, namely an incredible guitarist as well as a lawyer.

Rat Pak Records Set To Release Lynch Mob “The Brotherhood”

Produced by Chris “The Wizard” Collier (Lynch Mob; Flotsam And Jetsam; Prong; KXM),“The Brotherhood” features eleven brand new hard rock tracks from Lynch Mob. This album will surely resonate with long time fans of the band, as well as those longing for that good ol’ hard rock sound and feel. “The Brotherhood” highlights the unique pairing of Oni Logan and George Lynch, and along with Sean McNabb (bass) and Jimmy D’Anda (drums), the band has created a solid offering from start to finish. From the heavy guitar riffs of the opening track “Main Offender” to the melodic album finale ”Miles Away,” Lynch Mob have once again proven they remain on top of their game and at the top of their genre!

On the subject of Lynch Mob’s new record, Oni Logan comments, “After doing quite a few miles together with this latest lineup of Sean McNabb and Jimmy D’Anda, we consider ourselves a pack of wolves, and we came up with the name ‘The Brotherhood’ for the title of the next Lynch Mob album. It’s got more of an adventurous sound in part and maybe a darker, colder sound to it. We are always willing to go further. We come from the early 90’s, and it’s when we released the first Lynch Mob album which set a sound and course for us. Here we are 27 years later, George and I are still able to keep on stretching. As a player, as a writer, that is very important to us. Otherwise, we would be fooling ourselves and fooling you”.

George Lynch adds, “We wrote this album as a band, and the name of the record reflects what the band is about, and what all my bands have been about since I’ve been a kid. This is my second family. These are my brothers. You go through a lot together and have a lot of experiences together. And that then becomes a part of the music.”

Official release date for “The Brotherhood” is Friday, September 08, 2017.

Tony MacAlpine – A Modern Music Virtuoso

By Andrew Catania 

An accomplished solo artist with his signature style, a competent band member, an enthralling session player, a master producer, and a crackerjack bitten by the travel bug – Tony MacAlpine is a name that rhymes and resonates in perfect unison with the modern techniques and contemporary trends of the guitars and music acoustics of the present age.

His style is unique, majorly inclined towards classical, rock and fusion. Holding a substantial expertise on his instruments and chords, he sure knows how to squeeze the tones and carve out music planes, in rock as well as metal domains, through guitars and keyboards alike.

Image result for tony macalpine

Born on 29th August 1960, Tony set his hands on a piano at the age of 5 and moved on to explore and ace the intricacies of guitar chords by the time he was 12. Having started playing at such a young age, it came as no surprise that Tony MacAlpine was introduced as an emerging music sensation in the Guitar Player magazine in an article by Mike Varney in 1984.

Having started learning the tidbits and intricacies of the chords, keys, and strings, Tony MacAlpine made a brisk and promising start to his professional career in the 1980s, launching his debut studio album ‘Edge of Insanity’ featuring Billy Sheehan and Steve Smith in 1986. A year later, he teamed up with George Lynch, Deen Castronova, Atma Anur, and Jeff Watson to produce ‘Maximum Security’ in 1987. Both records received a tremendous applause from the music enthusiasts and critics alike. Not looking back since, he has progressed to ace his domain and has produced some records and releases, solos and joint ventures, to extend his music profile.

tony_macalpine

Tony MacAlpine is known for the variety of his fusion techniques. He possesses this magical tendency to play complex shreds and pulls. One of his most famous techniques is the eccentric modification of sweep picking into sweep tapping, which he manages to pull through a perfect blend of his skills. Once influenced by the neoclassical metal genre, Tony MacAlpine explored and tapped into a variety of, not only experiencing it through his fingers, but leaving his signature mark on them before he finally landed in to play and ace the rock metal domain.

Besides his natural brilliance and learned expertise, the credit for the nuances and variety of his techniques can also be accredited to the equipment and instruments that he plays. From the Kramer, BC Rich, Mason Bernard, Peavey, Washburn Mercury Series, Carvin, and Ibanez guitars to DiMarzio and Seymour Duncan pickups, and from GHS and Ernie Ball Strings to Peavey, Rockman, and Hughes and Kettner amplifications, Tony MaCalpine’s fingers have befriended an extensive myriad of instruments over time, and a chronology of his releases and discography clearly indicates his passion for experimenting with new equipment and chords.

Some of the most notable highlights on his professional career include ‘Eyes of the World’, ‘Premonition’, ‘Madness’, ‘Evolution’, ‘Chromaticity’ as a solo, ‘Universe’ Live from Oz’, ‘Moon Babies’ with Planet X, ‘Cab Saga’ with the CAB, ‘Ring of Fire’, ‘Edge of the World’ with Mark Boals, ‘Live at Astoria London’, ‘G3: Live in Denver’, and ‘G3: Live in Tokyo’ with Steve Vai.

Check Tony out @ http://www.tonymacalpine.com/

Lynch Mob’s The Brotherhood Will Be Released On September 8, 2017

Produced by Chris “The Wizard” Collier (Lynch Mob; Flotsam And Jetsam; Prong; KXM), “The Brotherhood” features eleven brand new hard rock tracks from Lynch Mob. This album will surely resonate with long-time fans of the band, as well as those longing for that good old’ hard rock sound and feel. “The Brotherhood” highlights the unique pairing of Oni Logan and George Lynch, and along with Sean McNabb (bass) and Jimmy D’Anda (drums), the band has created a solid offering from start to finish. From the heavy guitar riffs of the opening track “Main Offender” to the melodic album finale ”Miles Away”, Lynch Mob have once again proven they remain on top of their game and at the top of their genre!

On the subject of Lynch Mob’s new record, Oni Logan comments, “After doing quite a few miles together with this latest line-up of Sean McNabb and Jimmy D’Anda, we consider ourselves a pack of wolves, and we came up with the name ‘The Brotherhood’ for the title of the next Lynch Mob album. It’s got more of an adventurous sound in part and maybe a darker, colder sound to it. We are always willing to go farther. We come from the early 90’s, and it’s when we released the first Lynch Mob album which set a sound and course for us. Here we are 27 years later, George and I are still able to keep on stretching. As a player, as a writer, that is very important to us. Otherwise, we would be fooling ourselves and fooling you”.

George Lynch adds, “We wrote this album as a band, and the name of the record reflects what the band is about, and what all my bands have been about since I’ve been a kid. This is my second family. These are my brothers. You go through a lot together and have a lot of experiences together. And that then becomes a part of the music.”

Official release date for “The Brotherhood” is Friday, September 08, 2017.

TRACK LISTING:
01. Main Offender
02. Mr. Jekyll and Hyde
03. I’ll Take Miami
04. Last Call Lady
05. Where We Started
06. The Forgotten Maiden’s Pearl
07. Until the Sky Comes Down
08. Black Heart Days
09. Black Mountain
10. Dog Town Mystics
11. Miles Away
12. Until I Get My Gold (bonus track)

Dokken’s Jon Levin Gives An Update On A New Dokken Album And Future Touring Plans

By Andrew Catania

I recently spoke to Jon Levin from Dokken about future touring plans and a new Dokken album.

“We’re on the road all of July; we come back to do some US dates, then were back to Europe.” Explains Levin.  “As November and December come, and things slow down, we’re going to start writing for a new Dokken record,”  I asked if it was going to have the classic Dokken sound or going in a new direction.  “It’s definitely going to have the classic Dokken sound.  We should have it released in May of 2018 I’m thinking,” says Levin.

When I asked him his opinion about George Lynch stating in my April 2017 interview with him that he stated there’s going to be another Dokken reunion, Levin says he encouraged singer Don Dokken to do the last one.  “I encouraged Don to do the reunion last fall.  If they do another reunion, I’m perfectly fine with it.  It’s Don’s decision to make.”  Don Dokken said in a previous interview that he doesn’t see the need for another Dokken reunion as the current lineup is doing fantastic.

For up to date Dokken tour dates, please visit their website @ http://dokken.net/