Kee Marcello’s New Record Scaling Up

By Andrew Catania

 

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Kee Marcello might not be a name you’d recognize to the average rock listener.  Kee has an impressive resume behind him.  He’s a TV personality in Sweden.  He was a guitarist for the multi-platinum band Europe.  During their heyday, Europe’s soft rock sound sold millions of albums and toured the world with acts like Bon Jovi.

Scaling up‘ shows off the talent of Kee Marcello as a singer, guitarist, producer and song writer.  The first song, ‘Black Hole Star‘,  has catchy riffs, and Kee’s voice sounds very similar to Richie Kotzen.

Songs like ‘Wild Child‘, I can hear John Sykes-ish vocals, and Ritchie Kotzen on others.  If you’re a fan of melodic rock and roll, catchy riffs, good song writing and music that you’ll turn up with your windows down, ‘Scaling up‘ is the record for you.

 

 

Follow Kee on:

https://www.facebook.com/keemarcello/

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The Evolution of the Electric Guitar

References to the guitar more or less in its modern form date back to the 14th century. In its infancy it had four courses of double strings and a rounded body like a gourd or a pumpkin. Its mother would not recognize it today!

Around the sixteenth century the guitar was a popular musical instrument amongst the middle and lower classes of Europe, and as it increased in popularity it began to undergo a change of shape. Luthiers began making instruments with single strings instead of courses and experimented with its form until, by the 19th century, the body of the guitar was made wider, and flattened out. In the twentieth century the wooden tuning pegs which adjusted the tension of the strings were replaced by metal machine heads. Now we have the shape that the modern electric guitar is based on.

The first electric guitars were made in the 1930’s in response to a demand from guitarists in bands whose rhythmic stylings could not be heard above the other instruments. The main problem with these electric guitars was that feedback was coming through the amplifier from the vibration of the guitar’s body. This challenge began the evolutionary process of the solid body electric guitar.

The early electric guitars had sound holes in the body that were smaller than the sound holes of conventional guitars. In 1924 Lloyd Loar, an engineer with the Gibson factory, used a magnet to change guitar string vibrations into electrical signals, which could be amplified through a speaker. Now it was possible to build guitars that did not possess sound holes but could be heard clearly through an amplifier. Amateur guitar players were able to get their hands on electric guitars through the efforts of Paul Barth, George Beauchamp and Adolph Rickenbacker who founded the Electro String Company in 1931. Their guitars resembled steel guitars, and were played in the guitarist’s lap using a slide.

Modern electric guitars are made of many thin layers of wood glued together. The top layer is often a more attractive wood to give the guitar a pleasing appearance, and the other layers are of a wood which gives a good tone such as poplar or ash. The use of laminates endows the instrument with the robust body and tonal quality that would be impossible in one piece of wood. The original solid body guitar was however, made from one piece of wood. In 1941 Les Paul turned a railway sleeper into an amplified stringed instrument. He called it “The Log”. When production of his instrument began he stayed with the conventional guitar shape to give his market a familiar image to relate to. Les Paul’s invention marketed as the Gibson Les Paul is still extremely popular.

In the 1940’s, the Fender Broadcaster Electric guitar came into the world. Nobody really noticed until Arthur Smith used a Broadcaster to record “Guitar Boogie” in 1949. After being renamed the Telecaster, it was put on the market in 1950. Another Fender model, the Stratocaster, caught guitarists’ attention with its distinctive tone and light weight. It’s still the second most popular guitar in the world.

Ibanez, Jackson, Paul Reed Smith, ESP and Yamaha have made solid body electric guitars with original designs, distinctive shapes and new materials mixed with modern technologies to produce more efficient and versatile electric guitars. Today’s electric guitars produce tones varying between futuristic music or quasi-acoustic sounds.

In the 1960’s, effects boxes introduced fuzz, delay, echo and the wah-wah sound to the arsenal of sounds available to the modern guitarist. A pedal operated by the guitar player’s foot turns the effects on or off. Now guitars contain software that lets guitars sound like other types of guitars or reproduce the sound of other musical instruments. With developments like the latest self-tuning guitars, maybe the old joke about a guitarist “phoning in” a solo will become a reality!

Chris Impellitteri Interview – The Guitarist of the Ages

By Andrew Catania

A mere finger shred on the guitar chords does not make one a great musician. It has to come from within as if you’re tugging on not just the guitar strings, but the chords of your heart. It is only then that the noise turns into music and profound melodies are created that resonate in the air, casting a soulful impact around. Judging on this precise criterion, Chris Impellitteri has definitely aced his job!

Chris Impellitteri is one of those rare guitarists that vent out their internal restlessness, noise, rage and anger by pulling out on the guitar chords and squeezing out tones that seem to touch and enthrall the minds and hearts of listeners.

In the raging rhetoric of the music world, Chris Impellitteri rose on the music horizon to gain a significant prominence in the music scene of the late eighties, when his band ‘Impellitteri’ that he cofounded along with Rob Rock, launched their debut album ‘Stand in Line’.

However, Impellitteri had made a notable hinting teaser about the grandeur he was to achieve through a black EP that he released in 1986, simply titled the ‘Impellitteri’. While not technically a full album, this was the release that established the band’s sound and is heralded by guitarists all over the world.

Their premiere presentation was an immediate hit and his unique style and signature vibrato was perceived to be of grandeur that matched with the likes of the notable music maestros of that time and even more.

The success of his EP and Frits Studio Release kick-started his career into high gear, establishing a credible profile with a myriad of music accolades and awards. He was officially declared as the ‘Fastest guitarist of all time’ by Guitar World Magazine in 2008, making him stand on a legendary plane with the likes of Yngwie Malmsteen, Eddie Van Halen, Randy Rhodes and other maestros in the fast, heavy metal genre.

A mere look at his discography, rig rundown and the style that only evolved to get better with time is a testament to the fact that he not only made it to the legendary bars but also elevated his celebrated stature to a height no one thought he’d be able to achieve.

His career profile encompasses numerous feats, albums, and accolades including ‘Grin and Bear IT’ (1992), ‘Answer to the Master’ (1994), ‘Screaming Symphony’ (1996), ‘Eye of the Hurricane’ (1997), ‘Crunch’ (2000), ‘System X’ (2002), ‘Pedal to the Metal’ (2004), ‘Wicked Maiden’ (2009), ‘Venom’ (2015), along with some notable guest appearances in ‘House of Lords’ in 1990, ‘Dragon Attack – A Tribute to the Queen’, and ‘A Tribute to Randy Rhodes’.

Here we share the tidbits of the recent interview that we had with Chris Impellitteri to satiate the cravings of his loyal fan base. The ‘fastest musician of all time’ was humble enough to spare some time out of his fast and busy schedule to touch upon the various aspects of his entire career and enlighten us with his personal thoughts, views, and experiences.

Photo taken at Mates in North Hollywood on 08/04/14.
Photo taken at Mates in North Hollywood on 08/04/14.

 

Chris, welcome to All That Shreds!  It’s a pleasure to have you here!

Glad to be here.

You grew up in Connecticut, that’s one thing that really kind of caught my eye, cause so did I but where exactly did you grow up at? 

Are you familiar with Ledyard?

Yes

So I grew up in Ledyard Connecticut

Where Foxwood’s Casino is

Yes. It didn’t exist when I was a kid.  I went to school actually with the two kids, I think it was their family actually got the funding and got all the permitting and went thru the legalities to actually create it.  It was crazy because I went back in like seven years after graduating high school it was a completely different place.

Yes, that’s pretty much how Foxwoods is and a lot of concerts actually go on there.  Mohegan Sun has got the arena but Foxwoods has this small amphitheater and that’s where a lot of the hard rock groups go and play their concerts at.

Yes I think I’ve seen some of that footage, you know in that place.  I used to be managed years ago by a man named John Sheard he was a really big concert promoter like in New Jersey and New York City in like the Meadowlands and Madison Square Garden.  One of his partners was a guy Jimmy Koplic. Jimmy did all the shows.  I think eventually he ended up doing things for Foxwoods directly.

Yup Jimmy Koplic and Shelly Finkel from Cross Country Concerts.  We’re really going back in time there.  I still got my ticket stubs.  

(laughter)

Well Jimmy, yes, I know Jimmy but Shelly he stopped many years ago he promoted Evander Holyfield the boxer he got out of it but Jimmy stayed in it.  I think he still does that for Foxwoods directly.

Your background I was going through because I have pictures of you and Joe Satriani from Guitar World back in 1998 it says Master Shredders.

You know I think Dustin had an email.  I saw that picture.  I do remember that.

(laughter)

How did you start playing guitar?  Did you work an early age; did you have any other instruments?

How did I start?  Well the truth is and then again not due to violence or anything like that.  So, when I was nine I lost my parents you know.

Oh, that sucks, I’m sorry, I didn’t know about that

No, no dude really it’s cool, it’s been so many years.  It was kind of a tragedy.  So, at nine years old I was, literally, I had no family.  Went to bed woke up and my grandmother, who adopted me, my grandparents’, they thought look, nine years old, lost his parents, we need to get him doing something so he doesn’t come up a screw up.  So basically, she asked me if I wanted to learn how to play an instrument and I’m sure probably the first thing I wanted to do is be a drummer, right, and they were probably like “NO”!  So, she brought me to a music store and I forget and um and on the wall, I will never forget this it’s been many years, there were let’s say a copy of a Les Paul it was like a black custom it was by a company called Cameo and then there was a kind of like a cream strat kind of like what Hendrix played, you know Fender.  I actually chose the Les Paul.  I was like, “I want that”! So, I picked it up and it was weird.  It was just something about it, as soon as I touched it, it was like, it felt like a part of my body, it was weird.  I can’t explain it, and from that moment on I immediately started taking lessons, started music theory.  You know and I just became addicted about playing my guitar.

Wow!

So that was basically how I began.  I wish I had a cooler story but that’s the truth.

When you started playing into your teen years did you have any like little bands that you belonged to or did you do anything to make yourself known outside of where you grew up?

Well yeah definitely of course! Like any kid playing music, I started in 7th grade.  I started like dances in high school, we were doing covers doing anything from Van Halen to Foreigner and that stuff.  You know we would do covers and of course, we’d do all the local keg parties.  Anything we could do, we would play. A lot of house parties.  I remember the backyard parties, you know.  Do they still call them keg parties?

I don’t know, I’ve been out of that scene for quite a while 

(laughter) 

Well back when we were kids, basically kegs of beer in the back yard on Saturday night and literally 1,000 kids would show up from high school so we would always be the band that would play that.  You know so I did that all through like 7th & 8th grade started doing the dances, 9th & 10th grade I was doing that and honestly by the 11th grade I was actually playing in the bars.  You know, I was sneaking, I was playing with all the guys, you know I was playing and they used to kind of sneak me in, get me up on stage and I’d do my thing, then of course take me out of there.  So yes, I did that for years and that is actually how I met Rob Rock.

Photo taken at Mates in North Hollywood on 08/04/14.
Photo taken at Mates in North Hollywood on 08/04/14.

Really?

Yes!  This is what most people don’t know it’s funny because we’re going way back.  This would be like early 80’s there’s a band called QT Hush and my band used to open up for them. My band we would play a lot of Van Halen covers, Ozzy you know stuff that was more guitar driven. This band QT Hush was a tribute to AC/DC and they were massive.  They were literally borderline playing in arenas on the east coast it was that big.  We opened up for them, and it was good because we were playing in front of thousands of people and their guitar player quit so they asked me to do the Angus thing and I actually did it for about a year.  You know you would dress up playing Angus and I would play mad solos, shredding and you know whatever, masturbating to the solos, Van Halen or whatever you know.  So, that was it, then I met Rob Rock and hence that’s where this whole thing began.

And that was in your teenage years? 

Yes, that was in my teens.  That’s probably around, I think I must have been 18 or 19 or something like that when I joined that band.  I almost didn’t graduate high school because of it.

How did you go from that band to your own band with Rob Rock?  Because the Black EP is like Holy Grail in the guitar community with others.  That was your beginning record.

Well Rob and I after that QT Hush band, we actually were on the New England circuit you know.  We would play all the places in New England.  We had a band called VICE and it was probably about 75% covers 25% was original music.  It didn’t really, we didn’t really push.  It didn’t go anywhere really.  The label that Ozzy Osbourne was on at the time that was called Jet Records.  The first two Ozzy records it was for Diary of a Madman and Blizzard of Oz and they were going to sign us.  Bring them to LA, to be honest the band hated me!  Because I was so driven.  They wanted someone that was going to be more pop, you know. Someone that was a little more. I think I was a little too, probably because I was 18 years old and I was full of fire.  I just wanted to do it my way, so anyways, they fired me. I went to LA so I figured, screw it.  Mainly because I was always pushing them to be better.  Yes, you know, I wanted to practice 12 hours a day play as many notes as I can, at that point I just wanted to play.  I didn’t realize at that time, oh there’s this thing called pace and melody.  Anyways,  I went to LA then I don’t know what happened.  My bud Rudy Sarzo was in a band.  Anyways they were looking for a singer and they had done a bit of reiteration to the band and they called Rob.  Rob Rock eventually got the gig.  They did a record.  Unfortunately, it didn’t go anywhere, they couldn’t get signed at least to a major label so Rudy and Tommy Aldridge quit, they went to Whitesnake.  Rob needed a gig and at that time I was literally writing the music for the Impellitteri Black EP and I was really into at that time I mean you know it’s funny if I look at this thing in perspective and open eyes when I first came out and I get it believe me is the Yngwie, you know I get accused of being a clone, you know like oh you’re ripping him off or whatever, the truth is, it had nothing to do with him or the whole Shrapnel crowd that Mike Varney had which is really a guitar person I really love.  It was really like a band like Iron Maiden, Judas Priest a lot of the British Metal scene but I loved the really fast double kick stuff and I started playing around with that and of course I really had a huge love for John McLaughlin & Di Meola had a huge influence on me so I just started blending all of those different styles you know and that’s literally how the EP came about.  We did it at a place called Baby-O Studios and I’ll never forget it because I was recording it and in Gene Simmons from Kiss came in.  It was really cool, I was this kid, you know.  I was in a studio, we were creating.  You know musically I don’t know what it was I still to this day get a lot of compliments.  I’ve had bands, huge bands, tell me, hey man we got that Black EP and we love that thing.  I’m like, how do you even know about it?

A lot of people have your video’s.  Many people remember you.  Many still listen to you, so yes

Oh, that’s cool!  I got to be careful about the video thing.  I did do a video which there’s one video out there and it’s horrific and I’m so ashamed of it.  There’s a thing I did with this company I think it’s called REH I think it was called, RH Video?  Oh, dude, it’s horrible!  I was literally like it was probably part of that period where you start getting some success and you’re partying all the time and experimenting with things believe me when I did the video I was heavily experimenting with some chemicals and dude I look back and think, I don’t play guitar like that and why would my manager even allow that to be released.  I’m just simply masturbating all over the guitar and it’s senseless! So even I would call myself wanker, I mean come on.

I’ve actually got your video on speed soloing from RH Video on VHS.

Well dude, I must owe you $60.00 and I apologize sincerely!! (laughter) If you pay attention, listen to the Black EP and you can obviously tell it’s much more controlled.  It is extremely fast.  It’s not that easy especially at that age.  That whole movement of shred, if that’s what we’re calling it, it was really evolving.  Yngwie had just come out, really.  Mike Varney was getting his team together.  He had some really amazing guys, obviously, I think the first one I believe was Tony MacAlpine I think and Tony was just a fantastic talent I think you know then of course everyone else.  When I was doing the EP, especially in the infancy stages of writing it and the solos, none of this existed.  We didn’t have that to benchmark so really you had to listen to the Di Meola stuff or the John McLaughlin.

Yes, I can hear a lot of Al Di Meola stuff in some of your music and that’s what I was going to ask you.  Is he one of your bigger influences like some of the other’s you’ve mentioned?
Yes.  I mean I will tell you for Di Meola I’m trying to think of what really affected me the most because I’ve seen Al, I’ve actually hung out with Al a few times.  Let me think about this before I answer this because what I’m trying to do is I’m trying to think exactly what was the Di Meola stuff specifically right, that really affected me to the point where I think it affected my guitar playing and my style. Because obviously with Night in San Francisco you know like Passion, Grace & Fire that stuff was hugely impactful as far as the way I articulate and attack the strings with my right hand you know because when I listen to acoustic players right, when their shredding they have a way of attacking the strings that’s very percussive right? So obviously, I would.  It is huge for me and Friday Night in San Francisco I think, you know Paco and Mc Laughlin & De Lucia that to me probably had the biggest impact on me.  For me the trouble was, how do I translate what they’re doing on an acoustic guitar to an electric?  You know to capture that percussiveness and that’s where my right hand, you know obviously, you have to master the left hand because that steers the ship.  It takes you to where you need to go and obviously, it’s critical for hitting the notes.  But the right hand for me, I want to use it more as a percussive instrument.  I don’t know if that sounds strange or if that makes sense but, you know

No it does! It makes perfect sense

So I’ve experimented and I’ve broken as many rules as I possibly can, not always for the better, but the reason I wouldn’t pick a lot of guys that do more like economy picking.  Yngwie does a lot of it Paul Gilbert does a lot of it and it works really good and I love the way they make it sound but for me I wanted that Staccato that really percussive tone alternately you get when you’re using heavy picks.  I mean obviously when you want to play heavy with your wrist for some reason I just couldn’t get that snap.  So basically, I would find myself breaking the rule and going to the forbidden zone which is not only using your wrist and your index finger and thumb in the circular motion then you’ll also start to use a little bit of your elbow which is forbidden.  You know what I mean?

Yes

It’s like the no, no!  It helped me get more of that attack.  Especially on the Black EP you can hear it

That Black EP is one record I and many others go back and listen to many times over.

Oh that’s cool.  You know the only thing, I mean look, I still listen to it, I guess as a fan.  I’m a fan of guitar players period.  But for me, yes when I listen to it I have tremendous respect for what we were able to do with that EP it changed my life in a big way but there’s pros and cons.  The pros are it was honest.  It was no one influence, so really I think we came into finding our own sound even though there were a lot of people trying to say we were clones of Yngwie or always ripping somebody, off right?  Which is just not true and that EP, it was really who we were.  Expressing ourselves, coming into our own identity.  So, that was the pro and I think we did captured it.  It was really a live recording.  As a matter of fact, it was mainly room likes and we did it I think it usually started around 10 or 11:00 every night in the studio because we didn’t have any money you know, we were basically poor at that time and you know we would go into Baby-O Studios which was again that’s where Gene was doing KISS demo’s and we’d use one of the rooms, My God I must have had 8 or 9 white Marshall Anniversary Cabinets.  We had probably 16 mics which people just don’t do.  You have obviously your ?? mic, you have all your ?? right in the center of the cones then we also had a room mic so we could capture the ambiance, you know.  So anyways by the time we did it you know I went, this is great.  As far as the production I wish it could have been bigger but you know it was really meant to be more of a live recording and capture the band live

 

Photo taken at Mates in North Hollywood on 08/04/14.
Photo taken at Mates in North Hollywood on 08/04/14.

Yes.  I do believe the Black album ?? sticks to the hands of time.  I just wanted to comment on something about people saying you’re a big Yngwie clone.  I’m a big Yngwie Malmsteen fan and you guys have two totally different styles.  You’re each your own person.  So, I would definitely disagree with them about that

Well Thank you and listen to people never for some reason when I say Yngwie absolutely in some manner affected the way I play but It’s unfair to say Eddie Van Halen didn’t or Randy Rhoads I mean come on.  Biggest influence is every guitar player, I mean if you’ve played a song or I’ve heard a demo from you at some point, you’ve probably influenced me.  I used to always laugh at that and I got it.  I was playing a strat, I was wearing the white boots you know in Stand in Line you know what I did with Bonnet and but the funny thing was, the people that were condemning me for it was like ‘dude this is hilarious, you’re not realizing what we’re doing’ and the Standing in Line video I’m actually playing a Richie Blackmore model and it was such a tribute to Rainbow you know like a watered down Rainbow that we were literally almost  dressing comically you know, kind of like Rainbow.  Then everybody goes, you look to rip off Blackmore, I’m like actually those would-be Blackmore guys which means, somebody else is ripping off Blackmore.

Wow! I didn’t even realize that your Stand in Line you had a Blackmore.  Who are you currently endorsed with because you’re using Charvel, Dean?

Yes, I’m working for Charvel now.  I’m definitely endorsing them.  We’re working right now on playing with the idea of making a signature model.  There’s one guitar they gave me recently it was sitting in the warehouse for probably 7 years and it was done by Grover Jackson, hand built, I think it was the original founders of Charvel came together.  They did this Legacy series and the very first run, the three of them actually hand built a couple guitars and they tried to sell them for some ridiculous amount at retail in stores for like $16,000 or $17,000.  Not one guitar sold. They were just too overpriced

Is this the one with the red on it that I see you with?

Yes, the blood splatter?

Yes

Yes, that’s the one guitar and dude it’s insane! You know, I mean it’s all hand built.  It’s really unique, you know it’s one piece maple neck but you see like the in lays or the center dots are all rosewood and the side markers are all brass.  You know the body, typical, I think we’re using ?? on that one, but sonically it sounds amazing.  I’ve got a ’58 Les Paul I used a lot on my recordings and this thing sounds equally as good if not better.  It’s different because Charvel sometimes has a compound radius this actually has a 12-inch radius all the way down pretty much like a Les Paul except with Fender. 

Are you still using your spider web guitar from Dean?

No.  I’ve got to be honest, I never did.  The Dean thing started only because when I did this, I did a project in Japan called Animetal.  It was a really silly thing.  We were basically doing a tribute to a Japanese band called Animetal out of the early 1990’s.  Sony approached me and Rudy Sarzo and Scott Travis from Judas Priest and this guy Mike Vescera and asked us to do like an American version of it.  So, we agreed and when I saw the concept I thought, oh my God this is insanity.  Kind of like KISS on steroids but the music has to be covers of famous anime songs but then just bastardize it and shred.  They wanted weird looking guitarists.  So I was literally in a nutshell when I saw that SGV thing which I thought was what I didn’t realize at the time is it was built originally for Zakk Wylde thru Dean.  So, I met the owner, he and I hit it off and he flew me down to his house in Tampa and I said yes I’ll use this and he said hey why don’t we do a signature guitar?   I said well, I’m really a strat guy man.  Really loyal to what I play not just the brand because it’s comfortable.  So, he made the guitar and before I really had any say he already tried to put it up on his website and sell it.  I think he actually sold some of them and I was like dude, I haven’t even approved it.  So, the short answer is No.  I never used the spider web guitar

Photo taken at Mates in North Hollywood on 08/04/14.
Photo taken at Mates in North Hollywood on 08/04/14.

I had no idea!

No. Sorry dude! No! Actually, the closest thing you’re going to find to me doing this, you know I’ve done signature guitars for Fender but mainly in Japan only.  Now Charvel is different.  Charvel, the blood splatter guitar, that’s pretty much what I’m working with.  Now the paint job forgives me, I didn’t do that it was already done.  You know, I don’t care it sounds so good and plays so well through my Marshall stacks.

I thought I saw the spider web in some of your videos on some of your recent Venom record from Frontiers?

No! That’s another guitar we were building.  No, no, no that’s like I don’t know if that’s a Charvel body and some strange neck I was building it literally in like my garage or whatever.  No, and I was actually having fun with that because basically did the graphic where we went well you can’t really do anything unique right?  Because Van Halen has done everything you can possibly do with graphics, right?  And so, I said for my love of Eddie and Randy why don’t I just do both?  So, I basically did some stripes and some dots, polka dots and it’s on the cover I think of the new Venom record.  And that guitar actually had a crazy neck on it.

So you didn’t agree to it?
Well you know it’s cool. I like Elliot very much but yes, they made me a couple guitars.  I think it’s just when you played something all your life, you know I was playing Fender soon after that Les Paul copy.  As a matter of fact, when Van Halen came out, the whole reason I got into Fender was when Van Halen came out that very first record where I lived in Connecticut and obviously, you did I was a little older, we didn’t have Charvel.  We didn’t know what Charvel was.  I looked around, I couldn’t find it.  I wondered what Eddie had.  So, the best thing I could do was buy a Fender Stratocaster which I did and then cut the body.  I did that for a while, then I got some real nice vintage Fenders stop cutting the body because it hurts their value so – hence that’s why I ended up sticking with the single coils for years

During the grunge movement of the 90’s did you do anything different with your music? Or did you stay true to your core and continue writing the music style that you have?

We did one record.  Impellitteri Black EP kind of gets noticed by the industry, you know especially in Europe.  I’m going to get to your answer really quick.  I’m just going to try to give you a quick evolution.  So, we did the Black EP which at that time it was advertised everything guitar.  Really popular magazines like Circus Magazine you know they all have them like the inside covers there’s a lot of advertising and I think it was Kerrang! Magazine in England and that’s where this whole stupid fastest guitar player in the world thing, at least for me, started.  They called me the fastest guitar player in the world it’s some stupid crap right.  All of a sudden from Japan everybody noticed us from the Black EP and then Rob Rock quit and I was screwed.  I was like Oh my God what are we going to do?  I don’t have a singer.  So, at this time Sony and Relativity that’s where Joe Satriani and Steve Vai got signed for their instrumental records, they signed me.  I didn’t know what to do, I just wanted to get this Black EP out and tour behind it and they were like, Yes, but we need you to go do another record so we ended up calling Graham Bonnett, because Graham had ended up calling me gosh probably two years earlier to see if I would be interested in replacing Yngwie when Yngwie was in Alcatrazz.  So basically, I went and did the Stand in Line record, which by the way I really don’t like.  I’m not a big fan of it.

I do!

I don’t.  Cause listen, I was playing with a bunch of older guys.  We were almost 15 years old or something if not more.  I didn’t know what to do.  I was a heavy metal kid and the only thing I could think with Graham is why don’t you do something like a light sort of version of Rainbow and really that’s what I hear it as.  You know I hate guitar tone and it’s buried in reverb and I had no say over it.  With the Impellitteri Black EP, I was very involved with everything from the playing, the recording, the production.  Stand in Line I felt like literally it’s got my name on it but I have no control over this.  You know what I mean?

Yes

So there, we’re coming into the 80’s and MTV starts playing our video a lot Stand in Line which I do like stand in Line to this day.  It was just too big of production but I like the song.  So, we started doing MTV and I guess we were in the eye of the media and we were getting a lot of coverage and Japan all of a sudden really really take off for us.  You know like really big.  And I know like that when people say oh when you can’t make it in America you’ve got to go to Japan you’ll be a rock star right but for us all of a sudden we were playing arenas, masses.  Not like the smaller version would go to Japan and play clubs.  You know our first show was at the Tokyo Dome.  So, we were doing really big things and that kind of gave us life.  Even though what was about to come around the corner is grunge right?

Yes

So at this time, also let’s not forget Guns & Roses are really changing.  The music scene you know, you’re coming out of that.  I was more of a shred guy borderline thrash with the Black EP you know again, Maiden, Priest even Metallica I love.  So, when this happens, Japan offers us a really really good record deal but now I’m listening to Guns & Roses.  Everybody in the media is slamming shredding, you know or anything that has anything to do really with the 80’s.  So, we do a record called Grin and Bear It for Japan it’s really riffy, it’s really more funk, you know funk rock.  So, that’s where you asked me did I do anything, did I change?  The answer is yes for that one record.  You know some of the stuff was really cool.  I still look back and listen and say you know that was really fun to play but it was not in the direction we should have been going with

Impellitteri, so thank God, we do that, it sold, Ok.  We probably sold like 50,000 records or something like that in Japan, not very much.  The label they said look, we’re going to give you one chance, you need to go back to your roots, more like the metal stuff.  We did an EP called Victim of the System for Impellitteri and that’s only released in Japan.  But we’re getting more back in the direction of our Impellitteri Black EP and from there on in we just started being true to ourselves and kind of developing from the Black EP as we should have always done.  I know it’s a really long answer to your question about the grunge thing did make a change but that was kind of I don’t know if it’s a good answer but that was the evolution.  There was a little bit of change really quickly and then we realized, we’re deviating, go back.

Is that what you did to Answer to The Master in 1994?

Definitely! Definitely. Answer to The Master that’s a perfect example where you see like you know we’re getting thrown in with guitar players like I said I love all of the shredders and all of these instrumental guitar players but we are never one of those guys.  So, Answer to The Master you can hear it.  It’s more about the riff more about the band never mind the guitar player, if that makes sense.  I mean it has moments you know where you’ll see shredding but a lot of times it’s not the focus by any means.  It’s really about metal, the riff, the melody the song, the hook.

You’re absolutely correct.
When you went after you guys did that you went to Screaming Symphony did you stay the course there too?

Yes, I think so.  It was, when you say course, for me I’m always thinking once I came off that little deviation I kind of set my mind to say look that was kind of like the beginning of our identity.  Now of course you’re never going to repeat the record over and over again because that means you’re not growing.  So, every record is evolution but hopefully yes of course back on course from where we should have always been back with that EP.  I don’t know if that makes sense, but for me there is a direction.  You start, you kind of develop your sound.  You know which we did with the Black EP.  To me that’s like us, I mean three guys, we actually had a studio guy helping on bass as well you know playing in a room and you get that feeling of what do we sound like live, let’s capture that which kind of really tells you what the band really sounds like.  From there we just evolved.  So, then we’re on a course for whatever our sound is so that’s kind of what each record was.  I think Screaming Symphony was you know another evolution of where we’re going.  Remember we’re only getting older on every record.  So, the more you play guitar, the more you are influenced because remember every time we tour we are around other people, other bands.  We’re listening to other music.  You’re evolving as a human being and you’re absorbing like a sponge so it’s effecting you some way otherwise you’re dead.

That’s true.
What is your creative process when you’re writing songs for your records?

Well if I look at the newest records or even Wicked Maiden before that the way it really starts is that I every day, I don’t care where I am or what I’m doing I’ve got to have a guitar somewhere.  Whether I’m sitting down talking, or I’m outside at my pool right, I mean there’s always a guitar near me.  I could be upstairs in the house, I could be in my studio, I could be downstairs. You know no matter where I’m at there’s a guitar I’m playing.  The way my writing process works is all guitar players, we’re constantly we’re noodling, right?  We’re shredding, we’re playing, we’re having fun just making ourselves happy by playing the instrument and a lot of times what will happen is I will stumble upon a riff and I’ll go, oh that’s kind of cool, what’s that?  And if I really like it, I run into my studio quickly and I will literally record it.  You know just really quick or a drum machine.  Just a really quick track.  Identify what the tempo is and then I’ll just play it in a clip and I’ll just keep playing the riff until you know what I’m hearing or I think is really cool I’ll keep developing and eventually it leads me into a song.  That’s literally my writing process and sometimes it turns out to be a great song and other times I’ll listen back and go, God it’s horrible, what was I thinking?
(Laughter)

You know what I mean?

Oh Yes

And sometimes, when I begin writing it’s always the riff first without a good riff to me, it’s nothing.  I mean you could have the greatest solo in the world but without a riff or a good song, it really doesn’t matter.  So, for me, it always begins with a riff and that’s another thing too.  That’s where guys like Tony Iommi, Richie Blackmores riffs, those guys had a huge, huge impact on me.  I think even Van Halen we all love Eddies soloing his innovativeness think about the riffs he wrote.  They were great riffs.  So, for me, it always has to start their first and that’s the way I write

That sounds great.  What is your rig set up like these days?

Well to be honest, over the last 15-20 years I’ve been really using the same amps which are really, they’re vintage Marshalls. They’re 100 Watts.  The main one I use is a 1973 it’s a white Marshall head but it’s heavily modified.  When you look at the front of it you wouldn’t be able to see it still looks like a standard form put head but actually John Suhr and Bob Bradshaw had a company called Custom Audio they developed and they developed a pre-amp I don’t know how many years ago.  It was like a 3-channel pre-amp and what we did was we took channel 3 and we used that mod it’s my Marshall head.  So, it’s one of those heads even with a strat with single coil pickups you can plug directly into that thing and just start playing.  You don’t need anything to over drive the front end.  You know you don’t need any boosts, EQ or anything.  It’s one of those heads that it just screams.  So, I use that and I can’t even tell you I had how many heads, virtually I owned everything so on the records a lot of times I always start with my vintage Marshall and then I’ll blend.  I think on Wicked Maiden I was using Diesels I think we had some Engls but it’s always blends around the Marshall.

Were you ever using Engl amps?

Yes, of course! I was endorsing them for a while.  I was using the Powerball’s which I really like a lot.

Yes because I remember having pictures of you in front of them.  That’s why I knew you were using Marshalls but I didn’t know if you were endorsed by them previously

I did endorse Engl.  So, the answer is yes.  They gave me a ton of heads.  They gave me all these Powerballs.  They gave me, I don’t know what they’re called, they’re really expensive heads.  They’re like 3 channel whatever.  So, you know I had everything Engel.  I used it, I loved it, I liked it but to be honest, I was always finding myself even in my live shows, I would always be playing through my Marshall.  You know Marshall going through Engl cabinets this time but either way I was right back to Marshall.  So, when I was doing Venom I called Nick Bowcott and said, dude can I endorse you guys?  He said totally cool, absolutely, we’ll take you so I just decided to stick with what I was always doing to be honest about it which is hence, back to Marshall.  Which I never really left

Are you using Marshall heads in cabinets exclusively now?

Yes, that is all I am using, yes.  And like I say, mainly it’s always vintage Marshall heads.  You know I like plexis.  The cabinet’s I use differ.  On Venom, I was using both cabinets with a Celestion 25-watt Greenback and also Vintage 30’s.  So, I would do that and there were times with something on like with Venom where if you wanted a little more depth what I’d do is I’d add a 30:20 electrifier, just to triple track and bring it under the other guitars just for a little more body, depth.  I did that a lot especially on Wicked Maiden as well.

Nice! Nice!

That’s where you get that real full body.  You know your typical stereo track with your Marshalls.  And just for more meat you go up with the rectifier

You’re absolutely correct about that

You had some phenomenal songs on this album.  How was it to work with Rob Rock? Did you guys have a good relationship?

Yes, well first of all, we’d been friends first. You understand we grew up together playing in the bars together so as you’re maturing as a musician right you’re learning; you’re mastering your craft.  Every time you do that, if you’re doing it with someone like a team player your kind of evolving but your kind of understand how each other evolves musically and how they write and what their style is like.  So, for him and I it’s just really natural.  It’s just so easy.  I know when I’m writing a song I will always send Rob a vocal melody.  You know cause you’re a guitar player.  You know how it is.  You’re playing guitar, and you’re writing something, there’s a voice in your head and you’re singing, right?

Very correct

So that’s what happens.  So basically, as I’m singing that voice in my head you know I’ll lay it down in a demo and give it a quick vocal guy, give it to Rob because I already know how he’s kind of going to sing it and then you know if he likes it or he’s got something better he just takes it his way and then we get back together, we practice, go into rehearsal and work it out until we think it feels natural.  So, it’s great working with him.  It’s easy and there’s no drama he’s a great guy.

That’s really important to have no drama especially with the singer of the band

Well believe me, I’ve gone down that road.  He is one of the few guys and vocally you know I mean he’s one of these guys were like. You know he had a little bit of a struggle on one of the most recent shows we did.  He had a node or nodule on his vocal that he just developed but up until then, I mean look we’re 20 years now this dude is just on note for note.  I don’t care if he’s sick.  No matter where we’re playing, a 17-hour flight somewhere he’ll get up, play, no sleep.  He’s just great every time, you’re just like, wow! He has one of those rare gifts that what he does he can easily do live night after night and that’s pretty rare.

Yes, Rob has some pipes on him.
The Venom album did you do anything differently in terms of writing processes with Rob and the band or was everything just the same musically?

No.  Obviously, there were some differences John Dette who I played with in Animetal he played with Slayer, and who were the other artists? Testament and Anthrax recently filling in for Charlie on bass.  So, he came in.  He and I have been playing together with Rudy Sarzo for about two years and after Scott Travis in that Animetal band.  We were touring in Japan constantly and we did multiple records and we had built a good rapport and John is really an aggressive drummer so that affected me on Venom.  It really made me hunger more of an aggressive approach.  Even on the melodic songs we still wanted something more aggressive nature or an aggressive foundation for it.  So, that affected the way we were writing Venom and also because I am a fan of music.  I listen to everybody.  Everybody’s new record, I’m always going to listen to it.  What I do find a lot of times is that bands get older and when they are getting older they kind of slow down.  They tend to get more groove and whatever and I was like on Venom, no it’s actually the title track, let’s go the opposite lets push ourselves.  We’re not 19 anymore but we’re going back to that world.  We’re going to rest up, sleep, we’re going to get hungry.  Practice nonstop night and day.  We’re just going to push ourselves until we can get back to that time when we were just really hungry for it.  We loved it, we were energetic and you know when I was doing the Black EP remember shred was kind of evolving.  There really wasn’t anybody yet there to have said it on shred except Di Meola and the forefathers.  Yngwie had just come out so we can’t do a record and have that kind of style unless we’ve already kind of been mastering it for years before that. It was really fun because there were all these great players, Paul Gilbert, Vinnie Moore, Michael Angelo Batio there was Tony MacAlpine of course and with the element you have all these guys doing amazing stuff it pushes you.  So, with Venom I actually was going back and listening to a lot of different things.  You know when I was young doing the Black EP for Venom I would put on the Black EP and play along and go man this was fun let’s get back into this and then you go wait a minute, what were my peers doing, the other guys that were starting in this you know what was something like Racer X doing?  I’d just try to get energized by it.  So, that was some of the difference when I was doing Venom

John is an incredible drummer.  When you watch the videos, and listen to Venom it’s got your signature sound.  It doesn’t like, you know people get older and it starts getting softer.  You’re still balls to the wall.  You got John you’ve got an excellent band there and hopefully we’ll hear more from you in the future. 

Well, I hope so, yes! You know I just wrote another cool song the other day.  Right now, we’re working on something called Warhead for Impellitteri.  Next year is our 30th anniversary so you know I just got off the phone right now with a guy who kind of manages and is the agent for Twisted Sister.  So, it looks like next year we’re going to try I’m not saying certain what is going to happen yet but we’re going to try to go out and do a full-blown anniversary tour.  You know we just got back from doing some really amazing festivals in Europe and Asia.  So hopefully we will keep this going.  Especially next year since it is the 30th anniversary of the band.

impellitteri-venom-logo

And that was my other question it seems like you’ve been having a good time, out there overseas and you’ve been to some of the big rock festivals out there 

Yes!  This is the funny thing about Impellitteri if you were to ask your mother or sister, neighbor, brother or whatever 9/10ths of the people are going to say who? They don’t have a clue but it’s funny we go over there and they put us on the bill where we’re really really close to the headlining slot.  We just did Rock Fest with Iron Maiden.  We played right before Anthrax and Anthrax was right before Iron Maiden and so many bands before us.  Then we just headlined in Ansan Rock Festival in South Korea and dude it was probably close to 100,000 people came.  It was massive.  It was insane.  You can see footage on YouTube or whatever they posted and it was just unbelievable what we draw on some of those markets.  Even on the festivals we did this time all the big bands are probably going dude, why don’t you guys play, we got your records and we’re like, really, you even know who we are?  It was really quite funny

Yes that’s a question I’ve asked other people about the European audience vs American.  The European audiences seem to hold true to what they grew up with and they don’t change when the trends change like the wind like over there like they do here.  Over there you’ve got the Wacken Festival, you know all of them.  They have some huge, huge festivals out there.  Europe just seems like that’s where you’ll be more profitable.  You’ve had better audiences.  Forgive me if I’m wrong.  I was looking at your YouTube videos out there when you were at the Bang Your Head Festival, The Rock fest in Barcelona the Jisan Rock Festival in South Korea.  They were all into it you were really rocking those guys out there so I’ve always asked people is there a difference between European and American audiences?  It proves it right there in the videos

There’s no doubt about it! I mean listen we are and I also acknowledge this, we are really really lucky.  We were at the right place at the right time for Japan because you know when you said 30 minutes ago about grunge and the change?  You know grunge destroyed so many of my friends and their careers were over.  You know I cried for them because they were good bands, they worked really hard but there was really no other country that would embrace them.  For us the saving grace and this is where I really thank Graham Bonnet.  Even though I don’t really like Stand in Line the record, I owe Graham because Graham in Japan especially coming out of the group Rainbow and then he was in Alcatrazz, Michael Schenker Group he was massive in the early 80’s in Japan.  Even in Europe remember when he was in Rainbow it’s called Download Festival now but back then it was called Castle Donnington and he headlined as the singer of Rainbow with AC/DC opening, Judas Priest, Maiden.  You know Graham was this legendary guy he joined Impellitteri it immediately whether I was good bad it didn’t matter it seemed, to that audience, because they were going to give me a chance and it was just massive, it was all of a sudden they took us and all of a sudden now Impellitteri is competing with Metallica.  Not a band at Impellitteri level I mean literally we were competing for covers of magazines and big shows and record sales we are are up against these bohemas and that was a gift I really do believe.  There are plenty of other great bands that should have had the opportunity so Japan and some of that filtered off to parts of Europe for us and it’s weird it just keeps growing.  You know it just keeps spreading, it’s almost like a little disease.

It does.  
I know I said back we’re going to hear more from you in the future.  Are you working on a record right now?  I know you have the 30th anniversary coming out you wrote a song, are you going to have another release from Frontiers?  

The answer is yes.  I am working on something.  I haven’t made up my mind yet what I want to do.  Do I want to do an EP?  Do I actually want to do a full-length record?  I’ve already got some killer songs literally recorded.  So, I already know the sound of it.  It’s in the direction of Venom there’s no doubt about that.  So, I’m really happy with it.  The industry has changed so much. The Venom record we did, it was expensive.    I know a lot of people can do their records in their house now with pro tools, we didn’t do that.  We went to NRG Studios where you’re going to see Slash, Guns & Roses guys like that doing their records.  We spent an insane amount it was a lot.   We were talking to a guy from the 80’s where it cost half a million dollars to make a record so it was not cheap to make.  At the end of it we say man we spent a ton of money and no matter what we do, we’re never going to sell enough records to be reimbursed to re coop that.  Now I’m trying to look at it as an artist, like you, I don’t ever want to stop making music or recording so to continue to do that, how does our audience want to hear it or absorb it?  Do they want to hear it as a full record?  Will they even sit down ever and listen to 10 songs?  Or do they want to hear 3 songs?  Because remember we live in a world now where our attention span is very limited.  Think about all the things we have to preoccupy our time so I’d rather do a 3 or 4 song or maybe even 5 and do videos for every song and whatever that ‘new children’ is that we bring into life of music, I call them ‘the children’ whatever those are, they get 100% of our attention and anybody that wants to listen to us it would be accessible to us without giving them too much to absorb.  That’s where I’m at right now.  I guess it leaves me saying, I don’t know if I want to do a full-length album or an EP

 

Your 30th-anniversary tour, are you going to be touring the states with that?

You know honestly, I’ve wanted to tour the states for 15 years.  It’s really up to demand and the promoters.  I don’t really know if you know what goes on behind the closed doors of this industry.  A lot of it believe it or not is who you know, who’s managing you, who the agent is and 90% of these big festivals you see in Europe are all bands on there that are bought to be put at those festivals and it’s usually by a record label, like back in the past maybe it’s like a roadrunner:  Hey I’m putting all my bands on this label or on our label to be at this festival.  So, the same thing happens in the states with its promoters.  They’re looking for: hey how many videos do you have?  What’s your twitter account?  And dude, I am the worst, we have never embraced social media.  We don’t even, I don’t even think we have an official page.  People have hijacked my name.  There’s a bunch of Facebook pages.  I do have one that I recently got that I think it has a 7 in my name like Chris Impellitteri7 or something like that on Facebook and I do that but most of it is done by other people and we can’t even get our own page back, like Facebook, Impellitteri, I don’t even know who that is.

So when I met with you on Facebook, it’s probably not you?

Well it depends and I don’t know, I think I did actually get that one.  If there is a number 7 in that.  Then I had a personal Facebook page and someone said to change this to a band page and you can use both as soon as I did that I lost my original Facebook, I mean I can’t speak with people or something like that you’re talking with a guy that is horrible with this stuff.


 Impellitteri.7 that is where I messaged you or something.

Yes.  I would have gotten that definitely.  There is another page out there, it’s Chris Impellitteri it had like a brick wall picture or something like that and that’s someone else.  Then there’s Impellitteri for Facebook period.  You know like on Facebook “Impellitteri” Official page or whatever, and I don’t know who that is.  I’ve been trying to get that page back.

I’m sorry, where I was going through with the United States, promoters look at this stuff.  So, they don’t really care if you’re good or bad.  All they want to know is do you have ten million Twitter followers?  Are you with the managing company who also manages Brittany Spears or whoever because then there’s some sort of package they can negotiate and get you on.  You have to understand a band like us, we have a good strong cult following around the world.  I’m sure in the United States because we have done warm up shows in LA where literally we didn’t even do an announcement and we’d get to places where we are playing and there’s a line around the block for people waiting to get in and we’re like Jesus!! So, we don’t know how to convey that with promoter’s in the United States.  So, a lot of times they are going to try to promote us in some small club and unfortunately we’re not a club band.  We don’t want to do that.  You know we’ve always played theaters, arenas, stadiums.  America is challenging.  I can say we want to go out on our 30th anniversary tour it’s really dependent on the new agents we work with this year.  We’re going to try to see if they can make it happen.  We will definitely go out and do Europe and Japan of course, the U.S. I’m not sure.  I hope it happens, but you know, I’m not holding my breath.

OK.
Social Media wise, do you think that you’re going to embrace it?  It seems like that’s the platform that most bands have to do to survive in this new music age

I think ultimately the answer is yes.  You know it’s funny.  I’m aware of all these other bands because of social media, but yet I’m one of those guys who never embraced it myself.  I guess because I’m one of these guys, I’m not really good at networking.  I’ve never been one of these guys who has to go out and sell myself to people:  “hey we’re great, listen to us” I never wanted to do that.  I’ve always wanted to leave it up to the people.  If they discover us, and they like us maybe they’ll embrace us maybe we’ll make an impact and we’ll grow as a band.  I was never one of these guys out every night who tried to convince people to listen to our band and whatever.  I guess that is my issue with social media.  I feel like I’m doing the same thing again, like I’m trying to force myself onto people.  The answer is yes.  We need to do it.  Maybe we’re a little lazy.  We are very very blessed.  I mean we sold millions of records especially in Japan, we’ve done really well.  So, I sometimes think, oh we don’t even need to do it, everybody already knows who we are, you know, well everyone does not know who we are!   You know?

impellitteri-venom-cover-hi

Yes. 
I think a tour of the states would be good for the bands, you know when you look at some of the 80’s bands that have replaced singers and all that you know they talk, they are very big on social media it seems like with Twitter that just seems like it’s part of the equation to keep yourself alive out there and keep your name out.  It would definitely, especially with you, you’d have a huge following.  I’m sure you know how big of a following you have especially here in the states.  The promoters need to see that

Yes, we have a huge following in America.  I really don’t know.  I can only tell you that in Los Angeles a lot of times we’ll go and do these festivals or we’ll do an Asian tour you know we’ll always book a place.  We might sneak into a place like the Whiskey a Go Go or something like that but we don’t announce it until you get there, you do a sound check and you literally have hundreds of people around the block waiting to get in, you’re like geeze it’s literally 3:00 in the afternoon.  So, you know there is definitely a presence or people definitely know who we are and have interest but can we play a 4 or 5,000 seat place like we do overseas in the United States?  That I really am very skeptical about.  I’m not sure I could do that.  You know would people even come see us if we were in Texas?  You know 5,000 people or 3 people?

I totally understand. Do you have a picture of that Charvel?  Is that going to be your signature guitar?  Or have you even thought about talking to them yet?  

No, we are talking.  As far as the image of the guitar, I’m not sure.  I mean that is the guitar.  That guitar originally came to me and when they gave it to me it was a single coil guitar that was it.  So obviously, we routed it, we put a humbucker in it.  We changed the position of the volume and the toggle switch.  Basically, I hate the volume switch.  A lot of people like it with their pinky while their resting on their bridge, they like to roll their volume knob.  So, for me I actually developed and this is another weird thing, if you look at the video in Venom about two and a half years ago I again was experimenting and I actually changed my picking technique a little bit.  What I was finding with this picking technique which was really loose was and really a lot of attack, it was hitting the volume knob.  So basically, we moved the position to about an inch and a half and then we took the 5 way out and we put a small mini toggle so that way you could never hit anything below the bridge with your pinky or your ring finger.  So, those were small changes we made, small little embellishments.
So the answer is yes.  If you’re going to put a picture on your site just put the Charvel because that’s definitely the guitar I am using.  I’m actually using on the recording.  So, I’m doing a record, the stuff I recorded already, it’s all that blood splattered Charvel

Alright.  We’ll look forward to seeing that signature model pretty soon.  I’m sure Charvel makes some fantastic guitars

 Do you play any acoustic guitar?  

You know actually I just sold my Taylor’s.  So, the answer is yes because I love practicing.  I always practice acoustically period but I do play acoustics as well.  I am looking right now for an endorsement for acoustic.  So, I did think about going to Ovation because I used to love their older stuff and you know Rudy Sarzo just played with me in Impellitteri when we did the Korean shows.  He was playing bass for us.  So, I think Rudy told me he was endorsing basses for Ovation for acoustics so he told me to check them out.   I’m going to look into it

 

Why don’t you design your own pickups? I’m sure a company has offered.

I’ve had offers to do that.  To be honest, I’m really happy, like in the Charvel those are just PAF’s they’re 59’s in both of the bridge and the neck and for me I just love that tone.  With single coils with strats, I just feel like screw it.  Why design it if it’s already there?  For me, I love it, like the ’71 that’s all it is a 71 bridge pickup on that guitar you know you’re familiar with Impellitteri Black EP, I’m 99% certain the guitar did almost all of that record on was a 1979 Fender Stratocaster with just ’79 pickups going in to at that time I think I was using the vintage Marshalls and a of course I had a JCM 800 at the time and a tube screamer and that’s all  it was,  but the pickups there’s something about it.  They have a hollow tone to them so you get a little bit more of an ambience.  I think that’s what I like about those pickups.  Really weird, I know

I think just as a fan of yours, I think you should approach Seymour Duncan or Di Marzio and you should just design your own.  That’s probably the best way you can do it and you can do just trial and error and then put it to your new signature line.  You want that old strat sound 

I see what you’re saying.  Remember I’m deviated on the guitar because I’ve been old the last few years.  People don’t realize a lot of the years I was playing strats I always had Charvels too with humbuckers and as a matter of fact outside the Impellitteri record the Black EP and Stand in Line every one of those records have a routed guitar with a humbucker.  You know sometimes there is a single coil and a solo but a lot of time the rhythm stuff is all humbuckers.  So, in the last couple records it’s all been humbucker pickups and for me the 59’s just seem to work for me.  I’m pretty happy with them.  I don’t really know what I would do differently to be honest.  Because some have a weird pickup which works great when you run your amp wide open

What is your preference Japan or American strats?  

I’ve got to be honest with you I’ve played some amazing Japanese models.  Obviously, a custom shop in America is where I really got all of my custom strats from outside of the vintage strats and believe me I’ve had almost everything for vintage strats.  For me it was obviously they were U.S. because there was a point where they really were not manufacturing in Japan especially when you’re doing late ’50, late 60’s, 70’s early 70’s that’s all U.S. based.  Recently the stuff I’ve played, I’ve got to be honest with you some of the new it’s the American Standard.  I forget what they call it, whatever they’re making now out of the U.S. out of chrome or whatever, that start plays really nicely.  So, I actually like that a little bit better than what I’ve played with from out of Japan for Fenders.  There’s really no set answer.  It’s really just set on who in Japan or in America was building guitar.  Were they paying attention? They have pretty good quality control and it’s pretty consistent.  Right now, Jackson who is Fender they own Charvel, they own Jackson they own the EVH for Van Halen they just sent me a top of the line I think it’s called a Monarch.  It’s kind of like a Les Paul it reminds me very much of ESP’s Les Paul version. So, Jackson just gave me that guitar the other day and it plays insane and I asked the guy’s great who made it here in the custom shop?  They go dude it was made in Indonesia and I’m like oh my God it plays and sounds amazing.  It’s their top of the line guitar so they’re not even building that here in the U.S.  So, I guess at this point it doesn’t even matter where the guitar comes from as long as the luthier, whoever is in charge of building the guitar, is competent, paying attention and really cares about what he’s doing as far as quality

Yes, I’ve seen some guitars that are by the endorsee they are not made in the American shop they’re coming over from Korea.  I’ve got a MAB4 and it was made in Korea.  For a $400.00 guitar that thing sounds pretty good 

Andrew you are absolutely right! When Elliot flew me down to Tampa he said here let’s go into his little private stash and he said just start picking up guitars.  So, I started playing everything and my favorite guitar that I played there, out of this one split tail he gave me was a Dave Mustaine Flying V that was made in Korea and I go dude this thing is insane, the neck sounded great, it played great and I think I picked up they made something in the custom shop similar and I was like, the Korean one smokes it!

And that’s the difference between $499.00 and $5,000 exactly right! 

You know at the end of the day, listen to be fair it’s almost like saying it’s made in Korea it can’t be as good well think about it. What about some of the classical piano’s that come out of Korea.  They’re insanely good.  Are they less talented because they come from Korea?  It’s senseless! So, it’s the reality of quality control, what’s the components?   Years ago, people would kind of roll their noses up at it which means kind of snobby towards Japanese guitars and the problem would have been, what kind of metal were they using in the bridges, cheap right? Obviously, the tone, there is going to be some degradation in the tone of the instrument. So, that’s a big problem.  Japan has like overcome that.  Now the quality whether it’s Japan, Indonesia or Korea or where ever they all are kind of using similar components.  It’s now just a matter of does someone really is with someone, is there an element of pride in their job?  Because technically with everything they’re playing right now for God’s sake we live in the digital age where everything has a scan or some sort of numerical metric at the pitch of the neck and there is some sort of laser that you can see exactly if the pitch is off 100 mm of an inch, it has all of that stuff.  So as long as you’re paying attention it’s really inexcusable now to make a bad instrument

There is a difference.  When you pick up one of the Deans of Batio its so lightweight.  It’s smaller.  Then when you pick up an Yngwie strat it is heavier and bigger.  It’s almost like night and day if you take a picture in front of them.  I go from playing that and then you go to one of the Fender strats there’s just so much heavier and larger.  

You know it’s interesting you said that because weight remember is critical.  So, for me I guess this is really plagiarizing Van Halen’s word, I am also a tone chaser and believe me I am a studio nut.  I’ve owned major studio’s in Los Angeles and I have a major studio in my house.  I’m not talking about the little pro tools only thing.  I’m talking about big rigs and SSL’s and all that and for me personally I am absolutely addicted to tone and I find the heavier guitars, it’s probably why the tracks I do especially on Venom we’re talking about the new stuff but now I’m using the Charvel mainly but for Venom 90% of that record is my 1958 Les Paul which is heavy.  You know even the title track of Venom is actually I’m using it in the video it’s called Face the Enemy that’s the Les Paul I recorded all the record on and that thing is a tank.  It is so heavy.  Your left should be just killing you after it.  You’re like oh my God this thing is so weighty! Now do you hear a difference tonally?  Now it’s hard because Michael’s guitar has a humbucker while Yngwie’s has a single so the humbucker is going to have an advantage immediately because the width, the coverage of that pickup really acoustically, which one has the better tone?

Yngwie

Yes! It would make sense. Yes, that is what I would assume and then again, I’m not certain I have to hear it myself.  But I would assume because of the weight and obviously, it’s a maple board and all that, that would probably resonate more.  Where Michael’s guitar without an amp would probably resonate more in the shower, acoustically.  You need more of that kind of environment where it’s more ambiance to it to fill out a sound

Are you a producer of anything?  Because I realize you have these studio’s.  Have you produced anything that is out there?  

Yes. You know I don’t get into that. I’ve played on some of them records and you would know who the rock bands are.  I just don’t say it.  I will just say this I am a big junkie in the studio so I’m one of these guys I still believe in we love where we are with pro tools and digital but I think what the new bands are missing now is they’re missing capturing the bands live tonality.   Now when people record drums a lot of these people are doing drums on some sort of program.  They’re missing what the drums sounds like if you’re in a beautiful auditorium or in a really big room where you can do a 40-piece orchestra where the room lights up.  You’re missing so much of the instrument.  So, when I produce my stuff or produce or work with other bands if there is a budget there the first thing I do is ‘big studio’ not because it’s cool to be there it’s because you have the room

Yes, that’s very true.  I will look forward to seeing your signature guitar out probably next year or the blood splatter.

Who was the first to do the spider web design?

It’s Charvel.  They’re the first guitar company that did a spider web on a guitar.  Kramer did it years later in the early 80’s I believe but yes Charvel.

I didn’t know that.  Kramer, I knew had one but I had no clue that Charvel did 

Oh yes.  Just google it, put Charvel vintage spider web.  They were the first guitar company I think I had their catalog in 1981.  I bought one of Randy Rhoads‘ first guitar in production ever.  It had the original Floyd Rose that I wish I kept.  It had no fine tuners on it and again back then they had catalogues and it used to be able to see I think it was even in 1979 that Charvel I think you’ll see it it’s a pink Charvel strat with a spider web.  I kind of laughed at the Dean thing because you know I’m already heading back to Charvel and I didn’t even know it

Chris thank you for your time.  It’s been a pleasure talking to you.  

 

Copyright 2016 by All That Shreds

 

 

A Guitarist Dies

A guitarist dies and is quite pleased to find that he ends up standing before the pearly gates of Guitar Heaven. St. Peter shows him in and gives him a guided tour.

“This is Stevie Ray’s room here…” says Peter, and the guitarist is saying “Wow! Stevie Ray!”
“And this is Jimi’s room…” and the guitarist is totally over the moon.

Finally, Peter shows the guitarist to his own room. Before Peter leaves, he says to him, “I have to ask. Is Yngwie here?” Peter shakes his head sadly and says “I’m afraid he went… the “other” way…”

The guitarist is disappointed but goes to his room and tries to get some sleep. He is woken up in the middle of the night by someone playing a really fast harmonic minor lick – and it sounds just like Yngwie. He presses his ear to the wall and listens more closely. Someone in the next room is playing really fast neo-classical shreds through what sounds very much like a vintage Strat. The guitarist is confused as it sounds so much like Yngwie. The next day he tells Peter that he is almost certain that Yngwie’s in the next room.

Peter pulls him to one side, and whispers into his ear, “Shhh…. don’t tell anyone. That’s God. He thinks he’s Yngwie Malmsteen”

Nuno Bettencourt – Extreme’s Shredder

By Andrew Catania

 

Starting his career as the lead guitarist of the Boston funk metal band Extreme, Nuno Bettencourt is a Portuguese-born American guitarist, singer-songwriter, and record producer. His musical career rose to international prominence in 1985 after he joined the Extreme as a lead guitarist. From there he made a lot of mark on the music industry, from founding four different musical bands to designing The N-Series Guitars. Nuno Bettencourt is a Rockstar that actually rocks.

Nuno Bettencourt was born on the 20th of September, 1966 in Praia da Vitoria, Terceira, Azores, Portugal but grew up on the Main Street in Hudson, Massachusetts. As a boy growing up, Bettencourt was more into sports than music, he spent most of his leisure time playing soccer and hockey. His interest in music started growing when he started playing drums, which is his first musical instrument. Noticing his dedication and passion for sounds, his brother, Luís started teaching him the guitar. According to him, he didn’t realize how much he loves guitar till he started playing with his brother.

Nuno Bettencourt joined Extreme as a guitar player in 1985.  Extreme is a Boston-area musical band, made up of four members including Bettencourt as the lead guitarist, Gary Cherone, lead vocals, Pat Badger as the bass player and has Paul Geary for drums. Shortly after Bettencourt joined the group, Extreme got signed by A&M Records and they released their debut record in 1989. Some of Extreme’s major hits include the acoustic ballad “More Than Words” and “Hole Hearted” from the album Pornograffitti. The two songs made #1 and #4, respectively, on the 1991 Billboard Hot 100 singles chart. Pornograffitti album also contains one of the most impressive guitar solo of all time, the “Flight of the Wounded Bumblebee” inspired by Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov’s “Flight of the Bumblebee.” Extreme released another two albums and broke up in 1996 when Bettencourt left to follow a solo career. The band reformed in 2007 with exception of Paul Geary and releases another album “Saudades de Rock” in 2008.

Nuno Bettencourt entered an endorsement contract with Washburn Guitars in 1990 that lead to the design of Nuno Bettencourt very own signature guitar line The N-Series Guitars. Models from the N-Series Guitar line include The N5 and N6 and the famous N4 which is still used by the artist.

Nuno Bettencourt continues to be active in the music industry. One of his most recent collaborations was with Rihanna on her new album “Anti” in 2016. He has earlier worked with Rihanna on two of her albums; “Loud” in 2010 and “Talk that talk” in 2011. Along the way, after Extreme band broke up, Bettencourt form and founded four different bands including The Mourning Widows, Population 1, DramaGods, and The Satellite Party. He has writing and recording engagements with a lot of artists including Janet Jackson, Toni Braxton, Joe Jonas, Steel Panther, Rihanna and numerous others.  Nuno Bettencourt also joined Yngwie Malmsteen, Steve Vai, Zakk Wylde and others for the Generation Axe Tour which toured in the spring of 2016.  Nuno continues to be one of the top guitarists in rock today.

 

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Interview with Guitarist Fulvio Carlini from Sixty Miles Ahead

By Andrew Catania

Fulvio Carlini has a bright future.  A guitarist for the hard rock band Sixty Miles Ahead out of Italy.  An endorsement from Dean Guitars, and a band that seems to have a bright future with their upcoming record release on October 21, 2016 via Eclipse Records.  Fulvio has a condition called Dystonia.  After reading about his condition, I was wondering how he was playing the guitar with such resilience.  Fulvio gave me a more in depth look at Dystonia:

It’s a life-changing neurological movement disorder. Basically you’re not in control of your muscles anymore, in my case especially when I try to do precise movements with my right hand/arm and sometimes my right leg/foot. It results in having painful cramps and my limbs twisted to abnormal positions. It has no cure at the moment…hopefully it will be found soon, and I’m looking forward for that day to come 🙂

When I was diagnosed with this condition I was scared. Obviously fear is the first thing that comes to my mind thinking about those days, but I was also angry. It took almost a year to get the diagnosis (which is less than what it usually takes) and by that time it was almost impossible for me to play for more than 5 minutes. I thought that my career as a guitar player was over, and worst of all I felt different. I felt like I was not worth being near other people and not good enough for anything. It’s very hard to explain, but not being able to do normal things like writing or cooking or having a shower is something that can make you feel worthless. I lost my self-esteem and fell into a sort of depression.  Luckily I had and still have amazing band mates, great friends and the most wonderful girlfriend I could ever think of. I don’t know how I got through that period, but thanks to them I made it. Now I’m slowly learning how to deal with it, both physically and mentally. It’s not easy, but I know I can do it. I can give my best and be who I am in my own way. Michael J. Fox said something amazing about this: “acceptance doesn’t mean resignation. It means understanding that something is what it is and there’s got to be a way through it”

Right now I’m trying different therapies with my doctor: sometimes they work better than other times. But no matter which pill I take or which result has the therapy, I have to stay positive and think positive even when it’s hard to do.”

Fulvio’s amazing recovery in dealing with this condition has made him shred guitar with ease.  I asked Fulvio what his current rig consists of:

“My rig: well, my rig is very very simple. When I play live I use my twins Dean guitar (Cadillac Jekyll&Hide – I customized them, but there’s no J&H signature model in stores) Marshall JCM2000 100 watts and Marshall/Laney 4×12 cabinet. I have a tuner, Mar micro amp and Boss digital delay DD3. I’m one of those who don’t really like to carry more than the necessary on the road. My guitar tech Moreno keeps testing new products for me but every time I try to add something new it doesn’t feel the same. I don’t know if it’s good or bad but right now I don’t need anything else in my rig.

I use 0.11/0.54 Ernie ball string on both my guitars. The black one has a drop c tuning, the white one is tuned a half step down. I really like my two twins, they’re probably the best guitars I’ve ever had. 
I also use tortex triangle 1.14 picks.

For the “Insanity tour” I will probably use a line6 g30 wireless system.”

Check out Sixty Miles Ahead new record from Eclipse Records on October 21, 2016 via streaming services, Amazon, and other online outlets.

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Sixty Miles Ahead are a hard rock band hailing from the suburbs of Milan, Italy. Formed in 2011, the quartet has proven to be one of the most interesting outfits in their country, thanks to their impactful, captivating sound and their ability to hybridize hard rock canons with fresh solutions stemming from melodic heavy metal and a hint of contemporary rock. So far Sixty Miles Ahead have released two studio recordings, harvesting highly favorable reviews from all around the globe. The band’s intense live activity has seen them perform alongside the cream of the Italian hard rock scene, as well as international giants such as Richie Kotzen and Tygers of Pan Tang.

After a summer of composing and experimenting, the band released their 2011 debut EP “Blank Slate”, which exemplified how 21st century hard’n’heavy music should be done. Throughout the year, they performed many shows, and build a loyal following locally and internationally. The opening track “Polite Conversations” (also the band’s first video clip) piqued the interest of Italian music channel Rock TV, which invited them to perform a live-in-studio broadcast television performance in Italy. In 2012, the band released their debut full-length album “Millions of Burning Flames” via German label, Antstreet Records. This twelve-song album marked another step forward in terms of songwriting and boldness. The album received much critical acclaim from both old-school hard rock fans and modern metal heads with an open mind. Powerful catchy vocal melodies delivered by vocalist Sandro Casali, are paired with first-class riffing and exquisite solos by axeman Fulvio Carlini, both of which are sustained by the valuable rhythmic work of Luca Caserini. Even the most careless listen to the four singles selected from the record testifies to the extent of the band’s musical spectrum.

At some point in 2015 the band parted ways with Antstreet Records, and former bass player David Bosio made way for long-time fan and friend Francesco Li Donni. The band began recording new material, and started searching for a new label to call home. Shortly after the album was finished, Sixty Miles Ahead was signed to Eclipse Records (Mushroomhead, Bobaflex, A Breach of Silence). At this point the four-piece seems unstoppable and the band is ready to meet and shake the global rock scene with their new full-length album entitled “Insanity”. Sixty Miles Ahead are set to show the world (once again), that they mean business… Stand up and get ready to rock, because your ears are in for a treat!

‘Insanity’ is scheduled for release worldwide October 21, 2016.

 

 

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www.eclipserecords.com/sixty-miles-ahead

Are Bands Exploiting Their Fan Base Through Meet and Greets?

By Andrew Catania

This does not date back to decades but only a couple of years when crazy fans and music enthusiasts would try sneaking in behind the stage to catch a glimpse of their favorite music idol. And if they got lucky, click a photograph with them, brag about it in the circle of friends and family, and preserve it to show it to their grandchildren.
Later, as the music and showbiz industry took a creative-cum-commercial turn, many musicians, celebrities, and bands adopted it as a strategy to offer a lucky one, a chance to meet and click a picture with them after the concert.
This was something that the entire music world, including the artists and the crazy fans, went gaga over. It started as a mere advertising and promotional tactic, for musicians and bands wanted to lure more people into buying their concert tickets, and for fans, who would excitedly hope to be the chosen one. However, the stunt soon took a commercial turn. The celebrity management and music and showbiz marketing agencies soon detected the additional potential profit that could be slipped out of their fan’s pockets. And hence, started the concept of VIP tickets and the ‘sweet sounding’ meets and greets, a mere piece of paper costing a fortune that made you eligible for front rows or a spot closest to your favorite idol.
For those who don’t know, a meet and greet isn’t anything like a warm and friendly chit chat with your favorite singer, telling him how much you have adored him since your childhood, over a cup of cappuccino, and clicking a picture, in the end, to commemorate and cherish for a lifetime.
It is a long queue of hundreds of enthusiasts like you, who have dusted their pockets off to pay, only to shake hands and click a selfie or a picture of your favorite icon, that shows him/her flaunting a perfectly cosmetic smile or a pose in which he’s not even looking at you.
Today, music bands charge as much as $800 to $1500 and more for a mere click, in the name of meets and greets. Most of the time, the idea and activity are planned and managed by a PR or record label agency or the concert organizers. The exuberant price of these meet and greets cumulates to turn into millions that are shared in preset proportions by the singer or the band, the PR or adverting agency and the record label company. Hence, there’s barely any logic left to explain selling a brand on such preposterous prices and to advocate that it is okay to charge a blatantly high amount from those who can afford. What else could it be called other than an obnoxious business stunt and pure exploitation?
Technology, personal music gadgets, privacy breaches and illegal distribution of records have altogether cast a great cut down in the records sales. An individual is more likely to listen to the song on Sound Cloud or watch the video on YouTube, than dropping into a music store to buy the DVD. This is the prime reason that artists, bands, musicians, and singers are always on tours and they have the whole year’s concerts planned in advanced since this is the only way to make some profit and to make up for the high amount invested in the production of a music record. From this perspective, keeping the ethics aside, it sounds just business-like, as just another money making strategy. However, for this, a musician or band must have a sound and extensive fan base willing to pay.
The fans’ perspective varies in this context. It is mostly acceptable to the ‘diehard fans with massive pockets’ to spend for a picture with the idol. Even those who cannot afford to purchase these pricey meet and greets often wish to ‘buy’ the chance when their pockets are loaded. However, many others state it as pure exploitation and an immoral manipulation of the fandom.

The truth of the matter is that it is a mere money making stunt, and no matter how hard it is for you to swallow, your favorite icon and your idol too gets a share of the amount you have paid. However, the question that arises here is not if it is okay for those who can afford to spend on these meet and greets. The point to ponder here is:

“If someone charges you to meet them, do they deserve to be met?”

Jacky Vincent – Cry Venom’s Master Shredder of the New Generation

By Andrew Catania

Jacky Vincent is an English performer who was the lead guitarist and support vocalist of the American post-hardcore band Falling in Reverse from its arrangement until his takeoff in 2015 is and the present guitarist of the rock band Cry Venom. Vincent has one solo collection album titled “Star X Speed Story“, discharged in 2013 through Shrapnel Records.

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Falling In Reverse’s previous bass player, Nason Schoeffler, found Vincent through MySpace in mid-2008, Jacky was then requested to join. Vincent is a unique individual from the band. Other than his work with Falling in Reverse he has likewise discharged a performance collection called “Star X Speed Story” under Shrapnel Records. The 13 tracks in length collection are created without anyone else and highlight a couple of different guitarists and also a couple of his band individuals. Vincent was roused by guitarists, for example, Paul Gilbert, Michael Angelo Batio, Jason Becker, Vinnie Moore, Joe Satriani, and Steve Vai.

Vincent joined Falling in Reverse in 2008 as an establishing individual from the band. They discharged their presentation collection, ‘The Drug in Me Is You’, on July 26, 2011, which peaked at number 19 on the Billboard 200, offering 18,000 copies in its first week of offers. Falling in Reverse’s second studio collection, ‘Fashionably Late‘, was discharged on June 18, 2013, which topped at number 17 on the Billboard 200. The band discharged their third studio collection, ‘Just Like You’ on February 24, 2015. On  October 30, 2015, Vincent left the band on great terms to concentrate on his solo profession.

In 2016, Vincent framed Cry Venom with bassist Niki Gemini, keyboardist Colton Majors, lead vocalist Aleksey Smirnov and drummer Wyatt Cooper.  It is Vincent’s first band since his takeoff from Falling in Reverse in 2015.

Jacky Vincent has already utilized Jackson guitars as his fundamental instruments and claims 1 Dinky and 2 Soloists. Be that as it may, he is presently supported by Dean Guitars. Jacky Vincent now has 2 signature Dean Guitars.  One in which is the principle guitar he employments. It comes in purple, has 24 worries, has EMG pickups, and has a Floyd Rose special. The particulars of his mark guitar are recorded on the Dean Guitars site.

Jacky Vincent’s performances are regularly quick. He fundamentally utilizes clear picking blended with tapping in his performances.

He likewise utilizes quick legato keeps running as a part of melodies like “Farewell Graceful” and “Get The Phone” and “Destined to Lead“. Jacky additionally expresses that his greatest impacts were his father, sibling and hair metal groups. Jacky’s sibling made sense of how to tap on the guitar, as clarified in his Alternative Press Interview.

To conclude, Jacky Vincent is the true meaning of a modern day epic musician and guitarist. His playing style, skills, and energy are indeed second to none and always possess the capability to enchant and amaze listeners all around the world.

 

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Simona Soddu – Italy’s Young Shredder

By Andrew Catania

It’s exceptional that there’s many up and coming female guitarists.  Meet Simona Soddu.  Simona caught my eye when I was watching her YouTube videos.  Her acoustic version of Megadeth’s Tornado of Souls is phenomenal.  Influenced by John Petrucci, John 5, and Nuno Bettencourt, Simona showcases her talent through the passion you can hear in her playing.  Here’s some more information on Simona.

Simona Soddu was born in Cagliari (Italy), where she currently lives. She started playing guitar at the age of 13, learning from her brother first and then by taking private lessons from Brian Maillard (Solid Vision, Dominici).
In her teens, her main band was Grim Drowsiness (death melodic/prog metal), with whom she played live intensively and recorded a demo in 2009. During the summer of the same year she toured with Brian Maillard’s trio (progressive metal) to promote his first instrumental album called Melody in Captivity. Her role was to play the rhythm guitar parts. Between 2009 and 2011 she collaborated with Magic Salad (folk-rock) recording some guitar
parts in their first album “Every Forest has its Shadows” and playing with them in several live shows. Afterwards, she appeared as guest musician in the rock-opera ‘Checkmate‘ by D.G.I., performing the guitar solo on track 7. Between 2013 and 2014 she recorded her first instrumental solo album ‘Leftovers’ and started to actively run her YouTube channel with over 300 thousand views.
 ‘Leftovers’ is a collection of 11 instrumental tracks entirely composed by Simona Soddu during her whole music growth. All of these compositions were never been released for different reasons: some of them were supposed to be in the first album of her death melodic metal band Grim Drowsiness that eventually split up; others were rejected at the time; and some others were not suitable for the genre of the band she had at the moment of their conception. Thus after a while Simona decided to recover all of these ideas, literally “leftovers”, re-arrange them and put them together in this album. This is the reason why metal tones are often alternated to clean sounds or relaxed rhythms and the genre of Leftovers is overall highly diversified.
Simona recorded all the guitar and bass parts. The drums, as well as the keyboards, were written by Simona and emulated with a sample software, except for track 2, 4, 8 and 10 where drums were played by Davide Sgualdini who also co-produced, engineered, recorded, mixed and mastered the album. ‘Leftovers’ was released on November 14th 2015.

Simona is a talented player, who exuberates sounds of Satriani, and her influences of John 5 and Petrucci.

‘Leftovers’ is available on Spotify, ITunes, and Amazon.

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC0brtvs9gOj7J4Sx-y5iqHg

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